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Glossy Black Cockatoo Conservation

Glossies in the Mist logo

The Glossy Black-Cockatoo is a charismatic, beautiful bird. It is also vulnerable to extinction. 


The Glossies in the Mist project aims to protect the beautiful Glossy Black-Cockatoo in the only remaining vegetated corridor between the southern Blue Mountains and Morton National Park.


Traversing from Bullio to Bungonia, this important landscape connection is called the Great Western Wildlife Corridor.


By protecting tree hollows and feed trees (Allocasuarina species) within this corridor, it is hoped future generations will be able to see this gorgeous creature flying through the forests of the Southern Highlands for many years to come.


We need your help! Report your Glossy sightings!


GBCs - Photo by Charles Dove


About the 'Glossies in the Mist' project


Glossy Black-Cockatoos are declining in numbers as a consequence of the clearing of hollow-bearing trees and Allocasuarina species, their most important food source.


The Glossies in the Mist project aims to identify key feeding trees and map nesting hollows to secure foraging and breeding habitat for the glossy black cockatoo within the Great Western Wildlife Corridor.


The project relies on private landowners reporting glossy black cockatoo sightings, mapping stands of Allocasuarina and assessing feeding & hollow-bearing trees on their properties.


Identifying Glossy Black-Cockatoos


The Glossy Black-Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus lathami) is the smallest of the five black cockatoos in Australia. 


It's plumage is dull brown-black, with red or orange-red tail panels. It has a bulbous bill and a small & inconspicuous crest. 


Adult females exhibit extensive yellow patches on their head & neck and the tail panels tend to be more orange-red with black bars, but can become more red and less barred with age.


Some adult males have a few yellow feathers on the head and the males' tail panels tend to be bright red.


Young birds look similar to adult males, however they tend to have yellow spotted or streaked flanks and under-bodies, with some yellow spots on their head. 


Glossy Black-Cockatoos are notoriously quiet and regularly return to feed on favoured stands of Black She-oaks (Allocasuarina littoralis) or Weeping She-oak (Allocasuarina verticillata).


Female Glossy Black Cockatoo - Photo by Charles Dove


Male Glossy Black Cockatoo - Photo by Charles Dove



What is the Great Western Wildlife Corridor and why is it so important?


Located between Bullio and Bungonia, the Great Western Wildlife Corridor is an important landscape connection for the Glossy Black-Cockatoo and the only vegetated habitat corridor between the Southern Blue
Mountains and Morton National Park.


Glossy Black-Cockatoos require corridors of native vegetation with appropriate nesting and feeding habitat to move across the broader landscape, but the Great Western Wildlife Corridor is being increasingly
divided into smaller lots and cleared for new housing and infrastructure.


Map of the Great Western Wildlife Corridor



How can I help?


Have you seen Glossy Black-Cockatoos in the Southern Highlands or Tablelands? Do you have she-oaks growing on your property? Do you have trees with hollows on your block? We want to hear from you!


To gain further understanding and secure the Glossy Black-Cockatoo population in the Great Western Wildlife Corridor (GWWC), we need to map and protect favoured feed and hollow trees as well as monitor nesting success. And since a large portion of the GWWC is on private property, we need your help!


We will be holding a number of training sessions to assist landholders with glossy identification and behaviour, field assessment and reporting of favoured feeding and hollow bearing trees.


We are also looking for landholders who are interested in conserving remnants of the GWWC on their land. Landholders participating in the project will receive locally-sourced Allocasuarina tubestock, to improve foraging habitat for glossy black cockatoos.



The Glossies in the Mist project is funded by the NSW Government's Saving Our Species program, and is a collaborative project between the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, Wingecarribee Shire, Council, Friends of the Glossy Black Cockatoo and Forestry NSW.


For further details and regular updates, visit the Glossies in the Mist Facebook Page or contact Citizen.Science@wsc.nsw.gov.au

Last Updated: May 1st, 2018
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